Janis Joplin honored with posthumous Hollywood Walk of Fame star

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce is proud to announce that the late Janis Joplin will be honored with star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday, November 4th at 11:30 am.

“Janis Joplin is an iconic figure and her songs will always be remembered by her fans around the world,” states Hollywood Walk of Fame producer, Ana Martinez. “We are excited to add a unique tribute to Janis by her friend Kris Kristofferson who will perform a special acoustic version of ‘Me and Bobby McGee,’ which Janis famously recorded in 1970 yet was released posthumously in 1971, scoring Joplin a number one hit.”

Emcee Leron Gubler, President & CEO of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce and guest speakers Kris Kristofferson, Clive Davis, and Janis’ siblings, Michael and Laura Joplin, will help unveil the star in the category of Recording at 6752 Hollywood Boulevard. The star ceremony will be streamed live exclusively on walkoffame.com.

That voice – high, husky, earthy, explosive – remains among the most distinctive and galvanizing in pop history.  But Janis Joplin didn’t merely possess a great instrument; she threw herself into every syllable, testifying from the very core of her being.  She claimed the blues, soul, gospel, country and rock with unquestionable authority and verve, fearlessly inhabiting psychedelic guitar jams, back-porch roots and everything in between. Her volcanic performances left audiences stunned and speechless, while her sexual magnetism, world-wise demeanor and flamboyant style shattered every stereotype about female artists – and essentially invented the “rock mama” paradigm.

Born in Port Arthur, Texas, in 1943, Joplin fell under the sway of Leadbelly, Bessie Smith and Big Mama Thornton in her teens, and the authenticity of these voices strongly influenced her decision to become a singer.  A self-described misfit in high school, she suffered virtual ostracism, but dabbled in folk music with her friends and painted.  She briefly attended college in Beaumont and Austin, but was more drawn to blues legends and beat poetry than her studies. Soon she dropped out and, in 1963, headed for San Francisco, eventually finding herself in the notoriously drug-fueled Haight Ashbury neighborhood.

Joplin returned to Texas to escape the excesses of the Haight, enrolling as a Sociology student at Lamar University, adopting a beehive hairdo and living a generally straight life despite occasional forays to perform in Austin. But California drew Joplin back into its glittering embrace in 1966, when she joined the Haight-based psychedelic-rock band Big Brother and the Holding Company. Her adoption of a wild sartorial style – with granny glasses, frizzed-out hair and extravagant attire that winked, hippie-style, at the burlesque era – further spiked her burgeoning reputation. The band’s increasingly high-profile shows earned them a devoted fan base and serious industry attention. They signed with Columbia Records and released their major-label debut in 1967.  Of course, it was Joplin’s seismic presence that caused all the commotion, as evidenced by her shattering performance at the Monterey Pop Festival, which was captured for posterity by filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker. In the film, fellow pop star Mama Cass can be seen mouthing the word “Wow” as Joplin tears her way through “Ball And Chain.”

Big Brother’s “Piece of My Heart,” on 1968’s Cheap Thrills LP, shot to the No. 1 spot, the album sold a million copies in a month, and Joplin became a sensation – earning rapturous praise from Time and Vogue, appearing on The Dick Cavett Show and capturing the imagination of audiences that had never experienced such fiery intensity in a female rock singer.

Joplin’s departure from Big Brother and emergence as a solo star were inevitable. She put together her own outfit, the Kozmic Blues Band, and in 1969 released  I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! which went gold.  That year also saw her perform at the Woodstock festival.

Joplin assembled a new backup group, the Full Tilt Boogie Band, in 1970. She also joined the Grateful Dead, the Band and other artists for the “Festival Express” railroad tour through Canada. Her musical evolution followed the earthier direction of the new decade as reflected in her final studio album, the landmark Pearl.  Embracing material such as Kris Kristofferson’s gorgeous country ballad “Me and Bobby McGee,” and her own a cappella plaint, “Mercedes Benz,” the disc showcased Joplin’s mastery of all pop genres.  The latter song was, along with a phone-message birthday greeting for John Lennon, the last thing she recorded. She died in October of 1970, and Pearl was released posthumously the following year.  The quadruple-platinum set became the top-selling release of Joplin’s career and, in 2003, was ranked No. 122 on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Albums of All Time.”

In the years since, Janis Joplin’s recordings and filmed performances have cemented her status as an icon, inspiring countless imitators and musical devotees. Myriad hit collections, live anthologies and other repackaged releases have kept her legend alive, as have one-woman shows such as the hit Love, Janis (which Joplin’s sister, Laura, helped create) and 2009’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe “Best Solo Performance” nominee Janis. A documentary film is currently in development.

Joplin is also being celebrated with the Broadway musical A Night With Janis Joplin, which opened to rave reviews on October 10th. The New York Times raved, “A Night With Janis Joplin rocks the house.”  The show is being held at Broadway’s Lyceum Theatre.  The production arrived in New York following acclaimed engagements at Portland Center Stage, Cleveland Play House, Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater in Washington DC, Pasadena Playhouse, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, ZACH Theater in Austin Texas and in San Jose at the Repertory Theatre.

Joplin was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995 and posthumously given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005. But such honors only made official what rock fans already knew: that she was among the greatest, most powerful singers the form had ever known – and that she’d opened the door for countless artists across the musical spectrum.

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Author: Buddy Iahn

Buddy Iahn founded The Music Universe when he decided to juxtapose his love of web design and music. As a lifelong drummer, he decided to take a hiatus from playing music to report it. The website began as a fun project in 2013 to one of the top independent news sites.

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