U2 reschedules ‘Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’ appearance for May 8th

As U2 readies their iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE 2015 Tour (U2ieTOUR), kicking off May 14th in Vancouver, the band appears to be making good on their promise to reschedule their week-long Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon residency that had to be postponed last fall due to Bono’s cycling accident.

According to Sterogum, the band is scheduled (as of now) to be the only guest on the May 8th episode of the late night talk show on NBC. The band is listed as upcoming guests on the show’s website, but NBC has yet to confirm the guests for the week starting that night, Friday, May 8th, and whether it will be a multi-night event.

The appearance is in support of the U2ieTOUR and the band’s long awaited 13th studio album, Songs of Innocence, which was released through iTunes last September and then physically in October.

No word as to whether the show will incorporate any of the planned events for U2’s original residency including “Tonight Show U2 Lip Sync,” numerous surprises, multiple musical performances, comedy sketch appearances or online exclusives.

Bono, who fractured his eye socket, shoulder, elbow and left hand, is still recovering from the accident. The New York times caught up with the band in Vancouver, where they’ve been cooped up for the last week rehearsing for the trek.

“I really used to think that my head was harder than any surface it came in contact with, and I don’t anymore,” Bono told the Times backstage. “I didn’t come off a Harley Davidson. I came off a push bike and smashed myself to bits. There is no glory there.”

The singer is still recovering and assures his face and shoulder are better, but he does not have a fully functional left hand. He has a curled fourth finger and pinky, and states, “It feels like I have somebody else’s hand. [T]hey say that the nerves heal about a millimeter a week, so in about 13 months I should know if it’s coming back.”

“I really used to think that my head was harder than any surface it came in contact with, and I don’t anymore.”

While Bono can still use his left hand to grasp the microphone or point a finger skyward, he is still unable to play guitar. On January 1st, he penned an open letter to his fans claiming, “Recovery has been more difficult than I thought. As I write this, it is not clear that I will ever play guitar again. The band have reminded me that neither they nor Western civilization are depending on this.

“I personally would very much miss fingering the frets of my green Irish falcon or my (RED) Gretsch. Just for the pleasure, aside from writing tunes. But then does the Edge, or Jimmy Page, or any guitarist you know have a titanium elbow, as I do now? I’m all elbows, I am.”

Despite Bono’s lack of being able to play guitar, the band has a mobile recording studio set up backstage as they work on their next record, Songs Of Experience, on the road.

“At the very end of an album you’re at the height of your powers in terms of writing, arranging and performing,” The Edge told the Times during a dinner meeting. “It’s a shame that you have to stop then and start the other phase of what we do, which is playing live. This time we haven’t really stopped. Bono is trying to capitalize on that momentum and that sharpness.”

During his recovery, Bono has been writing songs, sometimes with a guitarist to play the chords he can’t, and have had various producers join them in Vancouver for the project. Songs in progress include “Red Flag Day, “Civilization” and “Instrument Flying.”

“They’re very basic earthy things, irreverent,” Bono states. “They’re not lofty themes. One of the things that experience has taught us it to be fully in the moment. What’s the moment? Pop music.”

No word on when the album will be finished or released.

Author: Buddy Iahn

Buddy Iahn founded The Music Universe when he decided to juxtapose his love of web design and music. As a lifelong drummer, he decided to take a hiatus from playing music to report it. The website began as a fun project in 2013 to one of the top independent news sites.